HOME > NEWS > Introduction of Fiber Optic Cable

Introduction of Fiber Optic Cable

DATE: 2011-11-29 | SOURCE: HOPE | Click:

In a world constantly seeking new ways to do things faster and more efficient, data transfer is no exception. Traditional copper wiring is rapidly making way for fiber optic cables. This innovative data transfer medium offers a faster, more efficient way to send and receive information as well as provide a great deal of communication networks for commercial offices and industrial buildings. Here is a guide to how they work.

 

Speed: Light versus Electricity. Traditional copper cables send the information down the copper line to the other end. Fiber optics transfer data using light pulses as opposed to electric signals, like those transmitted with copper cables. Light sends a much clearer and faster signal. This might seem unlikely, considering cables are enclosed in rubber tubing. But fiber optic cables are made from long, thin strands of glass or plastic. These pieces work to reflect light down the strip. To give yourself a visual, picture a hollow tube. Now mentally line the casing with tiny mirrors. Any light shined in would reflect off the mirrors one by one until it exited through the opposite end. Since light travels faster than electricity, the result of this set-up is a rapid, clear signal with less disturbances than traditional materials experience.

 

Fiber optics come in either single or multi mode. Single mode uses one lone strand of glass or plastic fiber for the entire cable. These can have a diameter of up to nine microns. Since they only use one piece, they are thinner and more susceptible to damage. However, the individual strand allows an increasedrate of transmission and a larger range. Basically, single mode lets it go faster and further. On the other side, there are multi-mode cables. As the name suggests, there are a number of glass fibers inside these, measuring either 50 or 62.5 microns. The larger diameter, as you might imagine, allows multiple waves to transmit simultaneously. Plus, it offers greater durability, which means that is more widely used for generic applications.

 

Another variation is simplex versus duplex. Communication networks use either one-directional or bi-directional communication between the two points and fiber optics is no exception. Simplex is similar to single mode in that is uses a single fiber strand for one way communication. This style is somewhat specific to applications looking directly for one-directional data streams, such as, video and audio inputs and outputs. In the same way, duplex is also similar to multi-node, only instead of a slew of cables, duplex uses bi-directional communication, requiring only two wires. This allows for simultaneous, bi-directional data transmission. You can think of these two as a one way and a two way street. Both have their purposes and both are useful.

 

So when you go to pick out a fiber optic cable, there are a few things you'll want to know. First, make sure that the type of connector you purchase matches your input connection. Second, check to see if your device prefers single or multi-mode transfer. Figure out if you need simplex or duplex. And finally, choose which length you need. You can discern this by setting up your system and running a string from the speaker or TV to the equipment. Always buy the next larger length rather than one that is on the small side. You won't regret it! If you're interested in purchasing any of these products , be sure to check out www.preformedline.com. Good luck and happy connecting!

( Edit: admin )
Facebook Twitter Youtube
Copyright © 2011 www.opgwfitting.com All Rights Reserved.
Powered by SEO | Fiber Optic Cable